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Olivia’s Summer Reading List

Posted by Dani on June 24, 2013

summer reading list
My 17 year old brought home a little light summer reading the other day. I was a little speechless. I think the picture speaks for itself.

When you’re swinging in a hammock or lounging on the dock this summer, is this what you’re going to be reading?

Death Of The Liberal Class

Or how about this?

Death In The Afternoon

Not me, that’s for sure!

Yikes! That’s all I have to say about this one:

The Origins Of Political Order

The 15 year old has an even bigger pile in her bedroom. The incredibly reading-positive librarian at their school allows the kids to empty out the library over the summer. My girls have 81 books signed out between them.

81??? I’m kinda worried. Really concerned, actually. How am I going to keep outsmarting them if they read all these books? Everyone knows parenting is all about outsmarting your kids as long as you can. Sure, you’ve got to nurture them, support them, set a good example, yada yada yada. That’s all fine and dandy. But the real secret is that you’ve got to outsmart them. And I think my days are numbered.

I think my summer strategy is to keep the girls busy doing mindless activities. Shopping, catching up on TV – things like that. That will leave less time for all these books.

Here’s Olivia’s reading list, in case you’re looking for something to while away the time. If you read any, be sure to send me a summary. That way, I might have a fighting chance.

3 books

Neverwhere, Neil Gaiman
The Stars’ Tennis Balls, Stephen Fry
The Human Stain, Philip Roth
Death Of The Liberal Class, Chris Hedges
Afeni Shakur: Evolution of a Revolutionary, Jasmine Guy
How The Hippies Saved Physics, David Kaiser
The Art Of War, Sun Tzu
War Is A Force That Gives Us Meaning, Chris Hedges
DeNiro’s Game, Rawi Hage
February, Lisa Moore
Stories: All-New Tales, Neil Gaiman
The Life And Opinions Of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, Laurence Sterne
The Devil In The White City, Erik Larson
The Thousand Autumns Of Jacob DeZoet, David Mitchell
Black Swan Green, David Mitchell
Nothing To Envy: Ordinary Lives In North Korea, Barbara Demick
Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired By Nature, Janine M. Benyus
Blackwater: The Rise Of The World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army, Jeremy Scahill
Waiter Rant: Thanks For The Tip – Confessions Of A Cynical Waiter, Steve Dublanica
Paper Engineering: 3-D Design Techniques For A 2-D Material, Natalie Avella
The New Hate: A History Of Fear And Loathing On The Populist Right, Arthur Goldwag
The Book Of Laughter And Forgetting, Milan Kundera
Death In The Afternoon, Ernest Hemingway
Brief Interviews With Hideous Men, David Foster Wallace
The Shock Doctrine, Naomi Kein
Marianne In Chains: Daily Life In The Heart Of France During The German Occupation, Robert Gildea
The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2012, ed. Rich Horton
Hot Art: Chasing Thieves And Detectives Through The Secret World Of Stolen Art, Joshua Knelman
The Origins Of Political Order: From Prehuman Times To The French Revolution, Francis Fukuyama
A Hologram For The King, Dave Eggers
Freedom, Jonathan Franzen
Lords Of Misrule, Jaimy Gordon
All That Is, James Salter
Incidents in The Life Of Markus Paul, David Adams Richards
The Signal And The Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail – But Some Don’t, Nate Silver
Childhood Under Seige: How Big Business Targets Children, Joel Bakan

8 Responses to “Olivia’s Summer Reading List”

  1. jackie says:

    Oh my goodness, this excites me. Ok, well, I don’t think I’ll be reading any of those books necessarily, but I can’t wait to hit the library and take out a huge stack of books to pick my way through over the summer! I am soooo impressed with the number of books (and the type of content) that your daughters have stocked up on! Wow! Good for them!

  2. Gosh that book pile is even bigger than MINE! (and that says a lot!) Happy Reading! Let’s race to see who finishes first 🙂

  3. Well, isn’t she ambitious!? Jeez that looks about like what I would have read in summer when I was a kid, but not at 17. I was too busy out working part time and chasing boys 🙂 I guess you are lucky if she’s reading all that and not riding home on a motor cycle giving her Mom a heart attack at 4 a.m. Just saying!

  4. hahahahaha

    When I was her age, I remember my dad wanted me to read more, at least the newspaper. It did not help we wasn’t leading by example, but anyways, I wasn’t reading.

    I was so focused on working and paying for my school, that I ended exhausted. It wasn’t easy to do both things at the same time plus homework.

    So, the only free time I had I was either vegging or dancing with my friends.

    I don’t regret it a bit. But once in a while I wished I could have had more energy back then to read at least 1 book and say “I read that when I was 17”.

    Nadia

  5. Dani says:

    It sounds like you had your hands full with some very important things! Luckily for the girls, around here I worry about working and paying for school so they get to read! Hmmm…maybe I should read more and they should work more!

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